Stories We Tell: Race, Hermeneutics, and Public Memory Formation in ‘Get Out’

        Jordan Peele’s Get Out (2017) is like jumping in a pool fin the first days of the summer: there’s nothing particularly new to the feeling, yet it still feels… fresh. There’s a feeling of unfamiliarity, of peculiarity, of curiosity. There’s something keeping the viewer from being fully comfortable. Perhaps it’s knowing … Continue reading Stories We Tell: Race, Hermeneutics, and Public Memory Formation in ‘Get Out’

#HashtagHorror: Conference Proposal

Below is a conference proposal I'm submitting to The Popular Culture and Pedagogy: Twitter Conference taking place this upcoming November entirely on the social media site Twitter. It should be a wonderful, and unique, way to learn with and from others in a trans-disciplinary forum! Submission Proposal:    #HashtagHorror: Black Mirror, Shaming Culture, and Ethics … Continue reading #HashtagHorror: Conference Proposal

Technical Writing Syllabus- Summer 2019

This summer session represents my first foray into the teaching of Technical Writing! My students so far have been stellar, and we're only just getting started. We're taking a "learning-by-doing" approach this semester, which means we're producing work not just through technical writing genres, but through technical communication genres. This includes the construction of videos, … Continue reading Technical Writing Syllabus- Summer 2019

Hooks & Sinkers: Writing Effective Introductions and Conclusions in Academic Writing

Today I talked to some Clemson graduate students about the arts of beginning well and ending well in academic writing genres (WAC). I'm incredibly happy to have been a part of such an amazing event put on by Clemson's GRAD360 program, and to have had the chance to talk with such brilliant folks. Writing across … Continue reading Hooks & Sinkers: Writing Effective Introductions and Conclusions in Academic Writing

Book Review: Thinking with Bruno Latour in Rhetoric and Composition

        One could certainly be forgiven for asking the customary question in response to the title of this book review: what does a French sociologist and anthropologist, with no training in composition and seemingly no knowledge of rhetoric studies’ existence as a discipline, have to contribute to the field of academic and … Continue reading Book Review: Thinking with Bruno Latour in Rhetoric and Composition

Into 2019: Teaching with Mirrors (A Pedagogy Reflection)

Teaching with Mirrors Fall 2018 Clemson University        This semester has been dominated by an at-times overwhelming need for balance: balance between coursework and teaching, between video-making and lesson-planning, between writing and grading. Ultimately, the choice (a false one, as I’ll detail in a moment) seemed to be between success in my own … Continue reading Into 2019: Teaching with Mirrors (A Pedagogy Reflection)